NOC Dashboards for SDDC – Part 2

This post continues from the Operationalize Your World post. Do read it first so you get the context.

Dashboard: Performance

Is my IaaS performing?

That’s the key question that you need to answer. You need to show if the clusters are coping well. Show how the clusters are performing in terms of CPU, RAM and Disk.

The above dashboard is per Service Tier. Do you know why?

Yes, the threshold differs for each tier. What is acceptable in Tier 3 may not be acceptable in Tier 1.

The good thing about line chart is it provides visibility beyond present time. You can show the last 6 hours and still get good details. Showing >24 hours will result in visualization that is too static, not suitable for NOC use case.

Limitation & customisation:

  • You need 1 widget per Service Tier.
  • If you only have a few clusters, you can show multiple Service Tiers in 1 dashboard. 1 row per tier results in simpler visualisation.
  • In environment with >10 clusters, we can group them into Service Tier. Focus more on the highest tier (Tier 1).
  • In environment with >100 clusters, we need another grouping in between. Group the Tier 1 clusters into physical location.

When a cluster is unable to cope, is it because it’s having high utilization? I show CPU, RAM and Disk here. You can add Network as you know the physical limit of ESXi vmnic.

Disk is tricky for 2 reasons:

  • It is not in %. There is no 100% for IOPS or Throughput. The good thing is when you architected the array or vSAN, you did have certain IOPS number in mind right? 😉 Well, now you can get the storage vendor to prove it that it does indeed perform as per the PowerPoint 😉 If not, you get free hardware if they promise a fast performance that will meet business requirement.
  • You need to show both IOPS and Throughput. While they are related, you can have low IOPS and high throughput, and vice versa.

If the cluster utilization is high, the next dashboard drills into each ESXi.

We can also see if there are unbalanced. In theory, they should not, if you set DRS to Fully Automated, and pick at least the middle level sensitivity (3). DRS in vSphere 6.5 considers Network also, so you can have unbalanced CPU/RAM.

With the dashboard above, we can tell if ESXi CPU Utilisation is healthy or not.

  • Low value does not mean VM performs fast. A VM is concerned with VM Contention metric, not ESXi Utilization. Low value means we over invest. It is not healthy as we waste money and power.
  • High value means we risk performance (read: contention)

For ESXi, go with higher core count. You save license if you can reduce socket.

We can also tell if ESXi RAM Utilisation is healthy or not.

  • Customers tend to overspend on RAM and underspend on CPU. The reason is this.
  • For RAM, we have 2 metrics:
    • Active RAM
    • Mapped RAM
  • The value you want is somewhere in between Active and RAM.

In the dashboard, the 3 widgets have different range. The range I set is 30 – 90, 50 – 100 and 10 – 90.

Why not 0 – 100?

It is not 100% because you want to cater for HA. Your ESXi should not hit 100% as if you have HA, it would be beyond 100, meaning performance will be badly affected.

If the cluster or ESXi utilization is high, is it because there are VMs generating excessive workloads?

The dashboard above answers if we have VMs that dominate the shared environment.

  • CPU: show a heat map showing all VMs, sized by CPU Demand in GHz (not %), color by contention
  • RAM: show a heat map showing all VMs, sized by Active RAM, color by contention
  • Storage: show a heat map showing all VMs, sized by IOPS color by latency.

At a glance, we can tell the workload distribution among the VMs. We can also tell if they being served well or not.

Limitation & customisation:

  • You need 1 widget per Service Tier.
  • You can change the threshold anytime. If you want a brand new storage from Finance, set the max to 1 ms 😉
  • In larger environment, group your heatmap (e.g. by cluster, host, folder).
  • We can show individual VM, but we can’t show the history as there are too much data to show.
  • This needs to be done per Tier. 1 dashboard per Tier, as the threshold varies per tier.

Hope you find it useful. For the product-specific implementation, review this blog. To prevent vROps session from timing out, implement this trick by Sunny.

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