The Rise and Fall of Infrastructure Architect

I’ve been with IT for almost 2.5 decades. We are fortunate as we experience a once in a life time journey in technology changes. Technology has changed both work and life. Business now runs on IT, and what we know as banks, airlines, telcos, practically depend on IT. Within IT, applications run on infrastructure. This infrastructure has improved drastically that it has become a commodity. With the arrival of the cloud computing, it has become utility too. When something has come down to both a commodity and utility, the human who knows it follow as a consequence. The value of Infrastructure Architect has diminished, as the technology has become good enough, simple enough, and cheap enough for most cases. Granted, mega infrastructure such as AWS and VMware on AWS are complex. But how many of us are working there?

Most of us aren’t doing this mega infrastructure. Most businesses have <10K VMs. At 25:1 consolidation ratio, that’s <400 ESXi. At around 12 ESXi per cluster, that’s just 36 clusters, including HA. Space wise, it will occupy just ~10 racks. 1000 VM per rack for all compute + storage + network are doable.

Compared with say 10 years ago, it’s much easier to architect and operate a VMware environment with just 10K VMs. It’s easier because there are many references architecture, such as VMware Validated Design and VMware Cloud Foundation. For those using VMware on AWS, the design, implementation, upgrade and support are done by VMware.

So what can you do as Infrastructure Architect to progress your career?

If you are not moving into managerial or sales position, you need to add skills that are valued by CIO or Business. That means non-technical, as these folks care less about technical matters. The following diagram shows the career progression:

Since Infrastructure is becoming a service, you need to know how to architect a service (e.g. IaaS, DBaaS, Desktop as a Service).

  • What are the services the IaaS is providing?¬†How you define a service?
  • What metrics do you use to quantify its quality?
  • How many services? How do you distinguish between higher class service and normal one?

You also need to know what type of services are on demand. Yes, this require you to go out and meet your customers. Understand their requirements. What Price/Performance are on demand? From there, you can architect a corresponding services.

I cover this in more details in Purpose-driven Architecture, so I won’t repeat it.

Done reading it? Great!

The next step after Service Architect is Business Architect. This is especially valuable to CIO, who runs the business of IT. It’s also important to Cloud SP, whose business is actually selling the service.

For a start, know the business you are in. Below are the 2 main models. Be clear on the nuance, as Internal IT is morphing towards internal Cloud Provider.

As a Business Architect, you not just know the cost of running the service, but you also know how & when to break even. You do not have to responsible for P&L, as you’re not the CIO or Cloud SP CEO, but you play a strategic role to them. You’re not merely a techie. You know what to price, how to price and your price is competitive.

The world of Cost and Price is a complex one. vRealize comes with a tool to help you manage this part.

Summary

  • Systems Architect needs to evolve, as infrastructure is becoming commodity and utility.
  • Service Architect and Business Architect are the next steps for Infrastructure Architect.

The next post, VCDX meets VCOX, discusses this further.

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